As we inch our way toward Election Day 2020, we are receiving a natural increase in questions about the impact this will have on markets and portfolios. First and foremost, no matter what the polls and forecasts are saying in advance, we never know the outcome of an election until the votes are counted (as the last election clearly demonstrated).
Buckingham recently launched a video series called “Ask Buckingham” to address common questions and concerns about the state of financial markets. Through conversations with members of the Buckingham Investment Policy Committee and research team, this series seeks to give some perspective on the current state of things, historical context around prior crashes, why having plans before and during a crash is so important, and the behavioral challenges market crashes present us with.
As the coronavirus “COVID-19” makes its way around the globe, people are scrambling to wrap their arms around the latest epidemic and what it means. Thus far, it has reached 109 countries and appears to be headed for more. The overwhelming majority of cases to date have taken place in China, the country of origin, and it remains to be seen how effective containment efforts will be elsewhere.
The current coronavirus breakout seems to be on everyone’s minds, and rightfully so. As the number of infected people continues to grow, so might some of our anxiety about the spread and potential impact of the virus. While we don’t know how many people the virus will infect and the length of this viral cycle, we do know that you may have some questions about how this might impact your investments.

Feeling SECURE Heading into 2020

by Joe Pitzl on
Just like that, the 2018 tax changes that were supposed to be mostly permanent have been altered. In the following paragraphs, our associate financial planner, Justin Gabriel, breaks down the pertinent details of the new law that may be applicable in the years ahead.

Stuck in Neutral

by Joe Pitzl on
Often as investors, we are forced to endure prolonged periods where it feels like our investments are stuck in neutral. These stretches of time can test our patience and resolve every bit as much as when markets are plummeting. The natural instinct is to believe that something must be broken, so we are tempted to shake things up a bit.